The Plan: My Own

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It’s January and I am in Tallahassee. It is 71 degrees out and the sun is starting to go down. Despite that, I think I might make myself another pot of coffee. After this morning’s 2-hour long run, we got brunch—which is where the majority of my money seems to go towards these days. When we got back to the house, I quickly hopped in the shower, and was excited for the eventual transfer to my bed for an afternoon snooze to take the edge off. But that’s when my phone starts buzzing. Results are coming in!

With the start of the indoor track season these past couple weeks, things have started to heat up real fast. It seems like you can’t use the Internet these days without it telling you just how fit some of the top runners across the country are. Now as a track and field fan, it’s fun to follow. Though meanwhile, I am trying to be excited about my own training! Granted, most of it has been long-slow paced intervals, but that’s what I had planned to do. But I will have to find a way to beat these guys!

As I sit back and watch other’s times drop behind the protection of my computer screen, that leaves me in a precarious situation. What do I do about this? But perhaps more importantly, how do I rationalize this to make me feel better about myself?

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Now the easiest thing to say, which also happens to be the most aggressive [and meanest] thing is to wish that everyone else will burnout and that they’re peaking too early. Unfortunately, this isn’t true. That’s not to say it won’t happen to someone, especially with the excitement of an Olympic year, but I wouldn’t rely solely on this being the case for everyone. Athletes make breakthroughs, and NJ*NY isn’t the only team with a great coach who knows what they’re doing. There will be endless ups and downs between now and when it counts. But mentally prepping yourself in advance for those dramatic highs and lows will prepare you to better handle them when they do inevitably occur.

Maybe it’s a ‘problem’ in our sport, but the fact is that one day matters far more than any other. And whatever path is taken to ensure that you show up on that one day will be the right one. It’s just hard to know if you figured it all out until the race is finished.

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We have 6-months until the Olympic Trials, and that’s a lot of time to go through the many phases of training. And that’s more or less the point I choose to focus on. Six months is a lot of time. I can’t control anyone else’s plan, but mine is on schedule. My high school coach used to always tell me to stop worrying about what other guys were running. If I would just keep my head down, and keep doing what I am supposed to do to get better, then the field will eventually narrow. And that’s still the plan—head down, get better.

 

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Training Update

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After a slow start this fall, things have picked back up with much thanks to warm weather and a little luck. Since Christmas, I have been fortunate enough to find some more temperate climates: Phoenix, Austin, Tallahassee.

The plan at the moment is to continue running my base phase through the winter months, and keep the mileage high, and the workout volume up. With still two weeks left in Florida, and a blizzard at home, I can’t emphasize enough how great of a decision it was to escape those conditions.

Training is going well, and on schedule. Indoor will be short-lived, and I will be pacing some teammates in a few weeks, and then Millrose. If the body feels up to it, I may hop into one last-chance meet, but have no set plans to run USAs at the moment. All about outdoor!

Here was my last week:

Monday- 10 x 1k + 4 x 200

Tuesday- 12 miles

Wednesday- AM: 6 mile tempo / PM: 6 x 15 sec-hills

Thursday- 11.5 miles + strides

Friday- 5 x [3 x 300]

Saturday- 18.5 miles

Sunday- 6 miles

Total- 92.75

“He had no money and no home; he lived entirely on the road of the racing circuit, sleeping in empty stalls, carrying with him only a saddle, his rosary, and his books….The books were the closest thing he had to furniture, and he lived in them the way other men live in easy chairs.” -Laura Hillenbrand, Seabiscuit